GED Practice Test Math

Here are free Math tests without a timer that will help to get ready for your  GED® test. Officially, the GED Math test is called The Mathematical Reasoning test, and it lasts 115 minutes.

So get ready by taking one of these practice tests. You can choose a 10-questions,  15-questions, 25-questions, or a 50-questions test.

Take 10 questions Math Test

Take 15 Questions Math Test

You will need to know how to analyze a problem, find the necessary facts, perform the correct operations, and decide whether your result seems reasonable.

Take 20 Questions Math Test

Take 50 questions Math Test with a Timer

These practice tests are part of our GED online prep, click here to read how it works.

GED Math Test Overview

It consists of 2 parts. During the Part 1 students are not allowed to use a calculator. During the Part 2, you can use an embedded, on-screen calculator available to all test-takers.

Your ability to choose appropriate problem-solving strategies and apply them is important to your success on the GED Math Test.

Applicants may bring a TI-30XS Multiview Scientific Calculator (Texas Instruments) to use on the GED® test, but as said before, there is also an embedded, on-screen calculator available to all test-takers.

In Part 1, students can move up and down between the five questions, but they must finish that part and submit the answers to the five questions before they can move on to part 2 of the test. This way test-takers are prevented from using the screen’s or their calculator on Part 1 to calculate answers to questions where the use of a calculator is prohibited.

The Part 1 and Part 2 portions are not timed individually, so test-takers can decide for themselves how much time they want to use to complete both the non-calculator (Part 1) and calculator (Part 2) sections of the GED Math test within the allotted time, 115 minutes.

The GED® Math Test covers topics such as:

  •         Number operations & number sense (20-30%)
  •         Measurement & Geometry (20-30%)
  •         Data analysis, statistics, & probability (20-30%)
  •         Algebra, functions, & patterns (20-30%)

GED math formulas

The math formulas are also provided, so test-takers will not have to memorize them, they can use the Formula Reference Sheet to calculate their answers on test day.

How can you use GED math formulas

You will receive a sheet with formulas that you can use when you sit for the GED Math test. In this article, we will explain what Math formulas are and how you can use them not only to solve issues during our daily lives but also how to use them on the GED Math test.

Formulas are written procedures that offer a step-by-step methodological way to deal with and solve routine issues and problems in mathematics. They function as recipes and will be useful at times when you want to find specific information like volume, area, perimeter, the length of a missing side of a triangle, average, distance, or slope of a specific line.

Formulas can be used in every-day life to deal with tasks in or around the house. As an example, you are going to need the use of a formula to measure the area of a rectangle if you want to know how much paint you will need to cover all walls in a specific room.

More GED Math formulas use

Formulas are continuously used by electricians, engineers, architects, builders, farmers, and city planners in their workplace, and in school, we are using formulas in learning basic skills, in algebra, and in calculating geometric issues.

The GED Math test includes all of these interesting areas, and on test day you will receive a sheet full of formulas that you can use when taking the test. You are not required to memorize these formulas, but you will need to understand and know when and where you must use each formula and how you can use them to solve the issues described.

GED area formulas

Area formulas are used for the measurement of the surface of a specific space. You can think of area when tiling. The area is always measured and described in square units. If a closet floor is five feet, x five feet, the area of the closet’s floor is (5 x 5) 25 square feet. Your GED Math test formula sheet includes the formulas for you to find the areas of a square, a parallelogram, a rectangle, a trapezoid, and a triangle.

GED volume formulas

It happens quite often that we want to know the volume of a box or space for example when we want to ship certain things. When buying a shipping box, we will notice a label that indicates the cubic inches/feet the box holds. If we want to measure the volume, we multiply (the dimensions of) length, width, and height.

GED perimeter formulas

The perimeter is described as the distance around a specific shape. There are formulas to measure the perimeter of certain shapes, for example, rectangles and squares. Some irregular shapes require us to add all parts of the sides to measure the perimeter. The word rim (which means edge), is found inside the word ‘perimeter; and this helps us remember what ‘perimeter’ stands for.

The GED Math test formula sheet offers you all the formulas you need to measure the perimeters of a triangle, a square, and a rectangle.

Keep in mind that the GED Ready™ Test (the Official Practice Test) is the only practice test built to tell a student if they are likely to pass the real thing.

Covcell’ practice tests are not related to the Official GED Practice Test™ produced and distributed by the American Council on Education (ACE) and the GED Testing Service. ACE and GED Testing Service LLC have not approved, authorized, endorsed, been involved in the development of, or licensed the substantive content of these practice tests.